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Haloacetic Acid Testing Results in Public Water

Haloacetic Acids are a family of chemicals formed when disinfectants used to kill viruses and bacteria in community water supplies react with naturally occurring organic matter and other substances in the source water. The risk of illness from haloacetic acids is much lower than the risk of illness from drinking most surface water and some groundwater sources that have not been disinfected.

Read more about Haloacetic Acids in Public Water and Health

Haloacetic Acids include five related chemicals and have a combined maximum contaminant level (MCL) of 60 mcg/L:

  • trichloroacetic acid
  • dichloroacetic acid
  • monochloroacetic acid
  • dibromoacetic acid
  • monobromoacetic acid

Measure Description:

  • Public Water Systems - Avg is the number of community water systems that have an annual average concentration of a contaminant in the listed concentration range.
  • Population Served - Avg is the population served by community water systems that have an annual average concentration of a contaminant in the listed concentration range.
  • Public Water Systems - Max is the number of community water systems that have an annual maximum concentration of a contaminant in the listed concentration range.
  • Population Served - Max is the population served by community water systems that have an annual maximum concentration of a contaminant in the listed concentration range.
  • Public Water Systems - Qtr is the number of community water systems that have an quarterly average concentration of a contaminant in the listed concentration range.
  • Population Served - Qtr is the population served by community water systems that have an quarterly average concentration of a contaminant in the listed concentration range.
  • Average Concentration by Public Water System is the average concentration of a contaminant.

Use the tabs to see the different data visualizations.

Measures are defined above the visualization. Additional help can be found in the Help Section.